Himalayan Cats

Read our comprehensive guide to Himalayan Cats, including information on predisposed health issues, exercise needs, family friendliness, grooming, history, overview & temperament.

Cat
17 Oct 2023

History of Himalayan Cats 

The Himalayan cat is a fairly new breed and was brought about by crossing Persian cats and Siamese cats back in the 1950s. The breed was finally perfected after WW2 by Marguerita Goforth, whose efforts led to producing the Himalayan cat we know today.

The breed was officially given recognition and accepted into the Cat Fanciers Association in 1957, however Himalayan cats sometimes get grouped in with Persian cats. Regardless of what group of cat breeds they fall into, Himalayan cats are among the most popular of pedigreed cats to this day.

 

What to expect when caring for your Himalayan cat

Common Himalayan Cat Health Issues

Himalayan cats are relatively healthy felines, but some issues that can affect them include:

Polycystic kidney disease: this is an inherited disorder in which small, closed, liquid-filled sacs develop in the tissue of the feline kidney and can lead to kidney failure

Progressive retinal atrophy: this is a degenerative disease that affects the photoreceptor cells in the eyes, and can eventually lead to blindness

Some Himalayan cats are also prone to developing breathing issues due to their flat faces and can also develop hairballs often because of their long coat.

How Much Grooming Do Himalayan Cats Need?

The Himalayan cat is a high maintenance cat and owners may need specialised equipment to properly groom their pet. These kitties’ fur can become very matted if you don’t brush it every day, which can make grooming very painful for them. Be sure to brush their hair out using a slick brush everyday to prevent tangles and skin issues.

As with all other felines, Himalayan cats will need their teeth cleaned regularly to avoid dental issues and will also need their nails trimmed.

How Much Exercise Do Himalayan Cats Need?

Himalayan cats have fairly low exercise needs, however, to maintain their health and weight they will need a good balanced diet coupled with regular exercise. Try to put aside time to take them out and play games with them so they stay active.

  1. Himalayan Cat Personality Traits

    What to expect from your Himalayan Cat

    Himalayan cats are easy-going, laid-back and are often described as “dog-like” as they are very affectionate towards the humans that they love. Himalayan cats are very gentle, loving and extremely intelligent felines, and they also take after their Persian cousins in that they’re very laid-back cats who are more than happy spending their day snuggled into your lap. Whilst they can adapt easily and well to pretty much any lifestyle, they’re best known for being lazy lap cats who love to spend quality time snoozing. However, Himalayan cats are still active and love to play chase games and play with their favourite toys and get along very well with other pets too.

  2. Are Himalayan Cats Family Friendly?

    How will they behave around my family?

    Himalayan cats are great family pets who have a very affectionate yet easy-going temperament. They’re very devoted pets and will spend a lot of time on their pet parents' lap. They get on extremely well with both kids and other pets, and whilst they’re happy being left to play on their own, they definitely prefer to have company.

Key Facts Summary
Size:
10-12 inches
Weight:
7-12 pounds
Temperament:
Sociable, affectionate, quiet
Lifespan
9-15 Years
Average Cost:
£500

Himalayan cat FAQs:

How did Himalayan cats get their name?

Himalayan cats get their name from the Himalayan rabbit as they are very similar in appearance – both have similar colour points, with dark markings around their faces and feet.

Do Himalayan cats change colour?

Yes – in the first few weeks of life Himalayan kittens go through a colourpoint change, which is said to be linked to their internal temperature.

There are several common health issues that Himalayan Cats are prone to, and as a pet owner it’s worth considering insurance to help protect against unexpected vet bills. Take a look at Asda Money Pet Insurance to see the kind of cover you could get for your cat.

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